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Joel Brownstein Receives Award for SDSS Work

Joel Brownstein

The Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) has given its 2021 Special Interest Group on Management of Data (SIGMOD) Award to Joel Brownstein, research associate professor in the Physics and Astronomy Department. The award recognizes the work of Brownstein and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Team’s efforts in providing “an early and influential demonstration of the power of data science to transform a scientific domain.”

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Alumni Snapshots: Perry Hacking

Hacking in his airplane

Dr. Perry Hacking has always loved astronomy, so there was nothing for him to do but pursue and follow that passion throughout his life. “I had a one-track mind, and learning about astronomy drove most of my thoughts during my little free time and all of my energy behind my academic and professional life,” he said. “I never wanted some position or title—I just wanted to learn more about astronomy or contribute to the world learning more about it. I’m grateful I’ve been able to devote my life to something I love.”

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New Churchill Scholar is U's 6th, Tying Second-Longest Streak

Isaac Martin is a Churchill Scholar

Isaac Martin, a senior honors student majoring in mathematics and physics, has received the prestigious Churchill Scholarship to study at the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom. He is one of only 17 students nationally to receive the award this year and is the sixth consecutive Churchill Scholar from the University of Utah.

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New Perovskite LED Emits a Circularly Polarized Glow

Blue Wall header

Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have revolutionized the displays industry. LEDs use electric current to produce visible light without the excess heat found in traditional light bulbs, a glow called electroluminescence. This breakthrough led to the eye-popping, high-definition viewing experience we’ve come to expect from our screens. Now, a group of physicists and chemists have developed a new type of LED that utilizes spintronics without needing a magnetic field, magnetic materials or cryogenic temperatures; a “quantum leap” that could take displays to the next level.

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Last Updated: 7/10/19